Posted by: Apostolic Oneness Pentecostals | January 27, 2009

Employment For Convicted Felons

Its my goal to NOT be so heavenly minded that I am no earthly good. Tons of people read my blog day after day and I wanted to do my share of being an “all around Apostolic” that can share both spiritual and natural things to the Body of Christ. If your a convicted felon and think you cant get employment THINK AGAIN! There are jobs out there for people just like you. You ask “why would I want to help a convicted felon?” Well, it will make sure that they are not slinging drugs on the street or robbing you blind to support a gawd awful drug habit. Some people have made mistakes and deserve to be given a second chance. Didn’t JESUS Himself give you a second chance? I have a relative who is a convicted felon. After listening to their sob story and encouraging with the Word, I decided to do some research of my own to help him so that he can get a job and support his family. Below is the information I have come up with. You know me. I’ll do anything to witness to someone the truth of the Apostolic Faith which includes me helping someone find a job. Now, I wont fill out the application for you and I cant guarentee that all the employers listed will be able to help you, however, its a good place to start. Be blessed in the Name of our One True God, Lord Jesus Christ!

Here is a list of various jobs that ex-felons can hold:

Ebay seller
Walmart
McDonald’s
any type of fast food-related job
kitchen help in a restaurant
apprentice for a job such as an electrician, masonry
janitor/
maintenance
security guard
private detective
Publix
Kroger
grocery stores
Conway Trucking
trucking companies
pizza delivery
greenhouse worker
warehouse jobs
UPS
landscaping
construction
building
roofing
day laborer
work-at-home telemarketer
modeling
acting
nonprofit worker
church jobs
religious teacher
drug and alcohol counselor
private detective
factory jobs
  — even in management eventually
volunteering/community service type of work
help for small businesses
temp agencies–
for landscaping or anything
Labor Ready
recycling waste center
trash pickup and trash center
bounty hunter
bakery
food prep and counter work at a deli
courier
apprentice in carpentry
Goodwill
Salvation Army
factoris and industrial work
start your own business– making something, selling something, providing a service
Tips:

–large companies will most likely not hire you; small businesses very well might
–contact independent (not national) recruiters and ask what kinds of
checks they do– if they do local checks only, you’re good
–now’s a great time to start your own business

Further resources:

Help in all 50 States from HIRE:
http://hirenetwork.org/resource.html

National Transitional Jobs Network
http://www.transitionaljobs.net/Resources/Resources.html

Safer Foundation
http://www.saferfoundation.org/viewpage.asp?id=4

Here are some previous Google Answers which provide information on the subject:

“Felon Wants Military Career”
http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=453055

“felony conviction career restrictions”
http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=450410

 

Sources:

Faqfarm Forums
http://www.faqfarm.com/Q/How_does_a_person_with_a_felony_find_a_job_after_he_has_served_his_time

HIRE Network Letter to Target
http://hirenetwork.org/pdfs/TARGET.pdf

Open Society Institute Resource Listings
http://www.soros.org/initiatives/justice/links/barriers

Chicago Tribune article on Safer Foundation
http://www.saferfoundation.org/viewpage.asp?id=35&storyid=1039041965&pagetype=story

“Help a felon find employment!”
http://ask.metafilter.com/mefi/43097

“ex-felon employment and expungement”
http://chrisuggen.blogspot.com/2005/07/ex-felon-employment-and-expungement.html

Search terms:
employment felony

If you need any additional clarification before rating, let me know
and I’ll be happy to assist you.

What programs are available to assist convicted felons in gaining employment?

There are several programs available for ex-offenders. The Work Opportunity Tax Credit is available to employers as an incentive to hire felons. The Federal Bonding Program is another employer incentive, and ALL WorkForce development offices have counselors that help felons find employment. The Workforce Investment Act (WIA) provides funding for training and tools needed for a felon to aquire responsible and gainful employment. I have done extensive research on this subject and will be posting a lot of information on my web site www.felonresources.com in the near future. You may also want to consider temporary employment agencies. Many of them go out of their way to find employment for felons and many of these jobs are temp to hire. Please e-mail me at jking@felonresources.com if you have any further questions.


Responses

  1. i unfortunately was with a relative who was in the act of committing a crime..not really detrimental; but i did receive 3 years probation that was 11 years ago and i left a job of 6 years to attend school but things did not turn out like i expected. yes, i graduated with a 4.0 gpa but now no one will hire me because of my background. its only one charge of a felony 5 (theft) but its killing me. my resume is super impressive, i’ve been told, but i just started the expungememt procedure in june 2009. if i had known this would happen i would have started it in 2008 when i left the job. i am depressed, sometimes suicidal because i am scared i am going to lose everything. but the job site that says you can look for local jobs for felons, after you complete steps 1 and 2, won’t allow you to go to step 3!!! i found the site before i even found yours and now its still the same problem. its not allowing you to go any further. only to fill out what you are interested in and then the school part. i just graduated in august, as i stated, and i need to work or i don’t know what i’m going to do. my daughter and grandson live with me, and we don’t live where we can get to a bus so we have to keep this car. where can i search that will actually allow me to look at jobs that want me for my expertise. that will see me as a person who is experienced in customer service and computer literate.
    thank you

  2. Ok, my felony is from 1976 and it still keeps me out of position for employment. Yesterday, Nov. 6, 2009 I made a committment at the Urban League, Pittsburgh meeting with Roland Martin (as speaker) to work a year on this problem. I found this site on my 2nd day of this committment. I am also a college graduate with a BSIS, Information Science.

    I have for years now talked with people (who are not ex-felons and have jobs) about this problem. Now that so many are out of work and so many jobs have been shipped to other countries, we are under the totem pole, lower than the bottom. We are certainly not the pressing issue. Therefore we have to come together and lobby, hire each other, work this out.

    I am taking all suggestions, please help.

    • Yes we must lobby and help each other because it is quite ostensible that no one else have intentions of doing so. Perhaps a coalition for felons without work will help. It has to be will put together though. Because the coalition will certainly be scrtutinized profoundly. Perhaps a program from state to state will be just what the doctor ordered. Of course we have to start small,but with hard work and dedication it will grow. Please give me your feedback.

  3. I have consistently look high and low for a job to no avail. I am still optimistic though. However it gets very discouraging at times trying to find work. I have paid my debt to society, but that doesnt seem to matter. I cant understand how society can complain about the state of its crime rate growing at break neck speeds and the individuals going back to prison when no one will give them a chance. Its really crazy and sad that one can never regain status as a productive and nonjudged individual after release from prison. Everyone deserves a second chance. How can society know whether someone has rehabilitated if society doesnt give these men and women of x incarceration a chance. We are being continuesly punished long after our debts has been paid in full to society. X-Felons will revert back to what they use to do when they arent allowed to do anything else. You tell me? How can society have a right to expect anything else. We have to and must give these men and women a chance to become productive and law abiding citizens again. America is the land of the free after all, right? I am humbly sending this honest and simple requisition that someone hear the pleas from all who once were lost, but now is found. THANK YOU,

  4. I was formally a manager of a retail store that was located in a mall that closed down. I worked there for 2 years, doing all the work that goes along with being a store manager. Thank GOD that particular company gave me a chance. I say that because I am a convicted felon with 2 theft charges from 13 years ago and 2 drug charges from 6 years ago hunting me. I went to prison for several years and it changed my life completely. I am truly no longer the person the person that I used to be. I know that, the people who knew me know that, but unfortunately the employers that are seeking employees don’ t know this. Even though I have excellent references from my last job. No one is giving me a chance. I have applied for almost everywhere on that list above to no avail. It’s getting very frustrating. Me and my kids are one step away from being homeless and I am truly backed into a corner. I have no idea what to do. I am a black woman, so that is another strike against me because living in south Florida you have to be a foreigner willing to accept minimum wage for whatever job u do in order to get a job. How is a person suppose to rehabilitate in these conditions?

  5. By Michael Levenson, Globe Staff | May 27, 2010
    House lawmakers yesterday approved legislation long sought by Governor Deval Patrick that would limit employers’ access to the criminal records of job applicants, a change that supporters said would make it easier for former convicts to find work and avoid a return to crime.

    Moments after the bill passed, on a 138 to 17 vote, a throng of former offenders and activists who had been watching from the House gallery spilled into the halls of the State House, cheering and chanting. The bill was a priority for many of Boston’s ministers and others who work to reintegrate former offenders into society.

    “It’s so nice to have a voice that’s heard,’’ said Cassandra Bensahih, an aspiring medical secretary from Worcester who said she had served six months for a drug offense.

    “I’m not asking for a handout,’’ said Bensahih, a mother of three who said she had been turned down for jobs and for housing because of her record. “I’m just asking for a chance to prove myself. This is the chance.’’

    The bill is a version of legislation that passed the Senate in November. Under both measures, felony convictions on a person’s record would be sealed and unavailable to prospective employers after 10 years, instead of 15 years under current law. A House-Senate conference committee must now iron out differences between the bills.

    Misdemeanors would be sealed after five years, rather than 10 under current law. Some crimes, such as murder and manslaughter, would never be sealed to employers. The House legislation, unlike the Senate version, requires that sex offenses never be sealed, House lawmakers said.

    Both measures prohibit job applications from including questions about a person’s criminal record, although employers are free to ask about that during job interviews. That was known as the so-called “ban the box’’ provision and was seen as vital to giving former offenders a chance at finding work.

    The measure cleared the House without any debate, after lawmakers spent more than five hours behind closed doors hashing out disagreements. The vote fell largely along party lines, although six Democrats joined the majority of the House’s 15 Republicans in opposing the bill.

    “I feel very strongly that we should be strengthening the [Criminal Offender Record Information] law and not making it more weak, and I feel that’s what this does, absolutely weaken the CORI law,’’ said Representative James R. Miceli, a Wilmington Democrat, who voted against the bill. “People who have a history might end up in positions where they shouldn’t be.’’

    House leaders said the bill would reduce crime by giving offenders a second chance. One key supporter was Representative Eugene L. O’Flaherty, a Chelsea Democrat and House chairman of the Judiciary Committee, who said he had long harbored reservations about the legislation.

    O’Flaherty said he had worried for years that the bill would make it difficult for public housing officials, who are also governed by the legislation, to screen out former convicts who pose a risk to society. But after studying the issue, he said, he learned that the chance of a convict reoffending drops sharply after six years, so a 10-year limit on access to their records is reasonable.

    The bill “makes a policy acknowledgement about rehabilitation, that turning a corner actually means something in our criminal justice policy,’’ O’Flaherty told his colleagues in the lone floor speech on the issue.

    A jubilant Steve O’Neill, executive director of Ex-Prisoners and Prisoners Organizing for Community Advancement, said, “This is going to change things enormously, because now people get a chance to get their foot in the door and prove who they are and be considered for their merits before their demerits are counted against them.’’

    Mayor Thomas M. Menino, who has for years pushed for limits in the criminal offender record system and who has testified on the issue at the State House, released a statement praising last night’s House vote.

    “CORI reform is not about allowing those who commit serious crimes to escape the consequences of their actions; it is about helping those who make mistakes and pay their debt to society to be reincorporated as positive, contributing members of the community,’’ he said.

    Patrick’s office released a statement last night saying he “looks forward to working with the House and Senate to get a strong bill on his desk.’’

    “This is about being tough and smart on crime prevention, reducing recidivism, and helping ex-offenders get back on their feet to lead productive lives,’’ the statement said.

    Michael Levenson can be reached at mlevenson@globe.com.

  6. I used to be a good asset to a particular billion dollar plus company, a highly productive citizen who paid his share of income, property, and other taxes every year. Other than a mortgage, I had no other liabilities.

    Today, I am totally unproductive, a drain upon society as a convicted felon. I am no longer to able to be productive as I have been hobbled by a criminal record and can no longer obtain employment in my field and honestly, I don’t have the will to work for crumbs.

    I’m sure that there are hundreds of thousands like me, who have learned their lesson, paid their debt to society, and want a fresh start. Current law makes this impossible.

  7. With all of the so called monies that have been given to the agencies listed to hire ex-felons; write to the executives and gather petitions to demand accountability and contact local news, radio and print publishers to tell your stories.

    HOLD THEM ACCOUNTABILE AND MAKE THEM REVEAL THOSE HIRINGS.

  8. You will not get a job at Wal Mart with a felony.Wal Mart policy states that if you are convicted of a felony while at Wal Mart you are terminated and lose everything! I know, because it just happened to me.

  9. could u guys help me find employment? i live in south bend,in and i am a ex-felon

  10. This is in regard to the 5th post above mine, dated June 12, 2010 ‘leonard hamilton’ with the original article written by ‘Michael Levenson, Globe Staff’:

    What state is this in reference to and what is the name of the Bill? I’d love to present something like this to NYS representatives for consideration. NY has a very tough stance on ‘felons’ making it virtually impossible to find work – especially in this economy.

  11. Fistly, i thank you for reading myrsponse. I was released from prison about 2 weeks ago. I served 3 years and i have no plans on returning. However, i need assistance with furthering my education and obaining employment.

  12. I’m a felon and I need help finding a good paying job so I can be productive in society.

  13. Need a job been in and jail all my life. need help

  14. Keep praying and trusting god dont give up god has greatthings in store for you. STARTby living your life for god faithfully pray daily surrender all to him
    im tlling you there is nothing to hard for god to bless u guys he owns everything he said heaven and earth is and the fullness there all. He said what ever we ask inhis name he will give us ask god In the Name of Jesus bless me with my job and u have to have faith and believe keep looking dont stop and dont give up be patience that job will come to u trust me I KNOW IT!
    i know the power of prayer changes all things dont loose sight of what god can do he has all POWER! i dont care how u been in jail this is a new life and u be blessed abundantly. CALL SAFEFOUNDATION LOCATED IN CHICAGO, IL AND HARVEY,IL they help people get themselves together starting out with getting their education then employment trust me i know people that they have help and they are working.
    love you all

  15. I also am a convicted felon, i have 4 felonies,1989 burglary,[1 time]dealing in stolen merchandise,[1item,1time,]1985 tampering with evidence,[one time]and purchasing cocaine 100$ worth.I am like the all american kid,been married 12 years and have 2 kids,my life is going down the drain and i don’t know what i’m going to do.My home remodeling business in South Florida is out of business i cant compete with all the illegal workers that we are infested with in my state, i hired legal workers and paid lots of taxes,insurances,etc i have lost all my savings and retirement monies which are lost and it was a lot.my home is in forclosure and the list goes on.I am very upset my children are now feeling the affects of not having money cause dad cant get a job,Both of my children are honer roll students, athletes,and are full of promise.After i lost my business which is directly related to the banks screwing up the economy with the housing meltdown,and illegal workers, i looked for employment and was hired at a construction company who happens to be busy with goverment contracts,the pay was 60k a year and a truck,WOW I’M SAVED, no after 1 week of work my ancient, non violent record came back and they let me go, company policy they really liked me.Then a week later i landed yet another job with better pay and the same thing happened,my life is in ruins, My brain hurts and i’m pissed i don’t know what to do i am a very talented guy,even in today’s weak job market i can get hired easily cause i’m talented but my past from 20 years ago is killing me and penalizing my kids.Is there anyone out there who cares. what am i to do the politicians don’t help cause we can’t vote i am not a second class citizen though my country treat’s me like one.By the way i am a approved by the city i live in to coach little league and have been doing it for 7 years, most people know my past but they still want their kid on my team,they know i’m a great guy and all their kids call me coach,{the city background checked me nationwide and after they reviewed me they said keep coaching,i had the support of scores of parents}.I need a good job,can anyone help?


Categories

%d bloggers like this: